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Did the Raiders fleece the Bears in the Khalil Mack trade?

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Please, do tell us how the 4-12 Raiders pulled one over on the 12-4 Bears.

Seattle Seahawks v Chicago Bears Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Our favorite sport is a game played on a natural field in the elements. Individual man vs. man battles that make up a larger eleven vs. eleven warfare is what professional football is all about.

Three yards and a cloud of dust is our preferred way to move the ball, and defense (still) wins championships. Yes, we’re old school and we’re proud of that. We’re as old school as they come, so these last several years as we’ve started to see fans get away from the soul of the game, we’ve started to question what some of you guys are even watching anymore.

Cheering for our beloved Chicago Bears at our favorite local establishment has become quite the adventure when we’re surrounded by nerds talking about fantasy football, Madden video games, and grades.

Take the Sloan Sports Analytics Conference at MIT who just gave the Oakland Raiders something called the Alpha Award for having the best transaction in professional sports. I’m guessing you’re as confused as we are, so according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the award “winning” transaction was Oakland giving the Bears one of the most dangerous defensive players in the game today, Khalil Mack, and a second round draft pick, in return for two first-round picks, a third-round pick and a sixth-round pick.

Perhaps the nerds at MIT see the Raiders getting 4 players whilst the beloved only receive 2, making the 4>2 equation falling in Jon Gruden’s favor.

But Mack changed the way teams scheme against the Bears. He altered the course of an entire franchise, and he set the Bears on a path towards glory. A glory that will crescendo on February 2, 2020 in Miami Gardens, Florida, in the 100th anniversary of the greatest team in the history of teams, The Chicago Bears.

It doesn’t take a rocket surgeon or a mathematical genius to figure out who won the trade, all it takes is a general understanding of the game of football and a peek at the NFL standings.

I don’t know what these computers told MIT, but football games are won and lost on the football field, and a 12 win Division Championship team is greater than a 4 win last place franchise.